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Nepal Festivals

2010

Tiji Festival Mustang (Palace) May 21-23
Tiji Festival Mustang (Monastery) TBD
Mani Rimdu (Lama Dance), Tengboche October 26-28
Mani Rimdu (Lama Dance), Chiwang November 25-27

Tiji Festival Mustang

The Tiji Festival in Lo Manthang is one of the most important and colorful in Mustang. Held annually to chase away demons, it is a time of prayer and dance as monks don colorful costumes and masks and perform ritual dances watched by spectators (dressed in their best clothes and jewelry) who have gathered from throughout the region.

The Tiji Festival in Lo Manthang is one of the most important and colorful in Mustang. Held annually to chase away demons, it is a time of prayer and dance as monks don colorful costumes and masks and perform ritual dances watched by spectators (dressed in their best clothes and jewelry) who have gathered from throughout the region.

Mani Rimdu (Lama Dance), Tengboche

The Mani Rimdu Festival takes place every October straight after the full moon in the Tengboche Monastery, high in the Khumbu region of Nepal. Tengboche gompa is home to around 36 monks and 25 students, under the leadership of the Abbot Ngawang Tenzin Zangbu.

The festival of Mani Rimdu is a three-day affair, taking place straight after October's full moon. Sherpas and travellers alike flock to the scene to be entertained, and educated about the fundamentals of Buddhism as practised by the Sherpa people of Nepal.

Mani Rimdu (Lama Dance), Chiwang

Mani Rimdu is a 19-day sequence of secret ceremonies and empowerment culminating in the public festival which lasts 3 days.  It is an opportunity for Sherpas and Tibetans to gather and celebrate together with the monastic community.

Mani Rimdu is a re-creation of legendary events; the establishment of Buddhism in Tibet by the great saint Guru Rinpoche (Padmasambbava). Throughout the dances, symbolic demons are conquered, dispelled, or converted to Dharma Protectors as positive forces clash with those of chaos.  The dances convey Buddhist teachings on many levels from the simplest to the most profound, for those who do not have the opportunity to study and meditate extensively.

Chiwong was founded in 1923 by Sangye Lama, a wealthy Sherpa from Solu, who endowed the monastery with a large portion of his family's land.  Government land reforms reduced this considerably, but Chiwong remains one of the few monasteries in Nepal able to provide its monks with a grain allowance which is a great benefit to those from poorer families.

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